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in the impending tax hikes and budget cuts. focusing on a particular issue of the fiscal cliff. each day. this morning's focus was on the payroll tax cut. continues. host: joining us now is kim dixon, a tax policy correspondent for reuters. this is part of our series on the so-called fiscal cliff. today we're looking at the issue of the payroll tax cut. kim dixon, when did the payroll tax cuts issue come into effect? guest: about two years ago at this time. expiration of the bush-era tax cuts that began in 2001 were set to expire. republicans control the house. president obama wanted to continue them for everybody except those in the top 2% tax rate. --wasn't ended the year deal it was an end-of-the-year deal. the obama administration was looking for the stimulus measure. they thought it would be hard for republicans to oppose a tax cuts. host: the money rigidly was going where -- the money originally was going where? guest: going to the social security trust >> we take you live now to the u.s. capitol and house speaker john boehner. >> the president has warned us about the dangers of go
and over again. that is the model for this fiscal cliff discussion, making both the cuts and the reforms that are real and credible and politically difficult to reverse. that is the only signal we can send. it is the right signal to send to investors that we're serious about getting our financial house in order. german, thank you. this is your last committee meeting -- chairman, thank you. this is your last committee meeting and you will be missed. >>: back to the analogy of the avalanche, a -- going back to the analogy of the avalanche, when we had the subprime crisis, and there was no warning. likewise, we did have the same type of avalanche come tomorrow. there is no more confidence, nobody buys are debt. we would have increased interest rates and huge economic problem. we have two things in front of the spread not only the fiscal slope, but also the debt ceiling. treasury estimates at the end -- we have until the end of february. in solving it, would be better to put the debt ceiling in the package with the fiscal slope for a comprehensive solution? or would it be better to do them s
, and protect the middle class from the fiscal cliff. without spending cuts and entitlement reform, it will be impossible to address our country's debt crisis and get our economy going again and to create jobs. right now all eyes are on the white house. the country does not need a victory lap. it needs leadership. it is time for the president, congressional democrats to tell the american people what spending cuts they're willing to make. with that, i will take a few questions. [indiscernbile] it has been very clear over the last year and a half. i have talked to the president about many of them. you can look at our budgets where we outlined specific proposals that we passed last year and the year before. we know what the menu is. we do not know what the white house is willing to do to get serious about solving our debt crisis. [indiscernbile] i am not going to get into details, but it is very clear what kind of spending cuts need to occur, but we have no idea what the white house is willing to do. >> most public statements have been optimistic. we are sensing a different tone in th
-- outlining their proposal for approving the fiscal cliff. the gop plan would cut $2.20 trillion. there is a combination of spending cuts, entitlement reform, and new revenue. to read the letter, go to our web site, c-span.org, and click on the link. the republicans say their proposal is based on a plan from a former chief of staff which is different from the plan offered from the simpson bolls commission. here is a look at how the recommendations from the simpson bolls commission -- simpson- bowles commission is being used. host: at the table now, paul simpson-bowles -- simpson- bowles first put out their plan. for dulles trillion in death as a reduction over 10 years. -- $4 trillion in deficit reduction over 10 years. when they put this out, what was the reaction? guest: republicans in congress were lukewarm to the plan. president obama praised the effort, and cautiously said nice things about the effort, but did not embrace it. host: bring us up to present day. two years have elapsed. the fiscal cliff is upon us. now we see the two lead office of the report that out there agai
the fiscal cliff. now, the republican plan purports to cut $1.3 trillion and raise $800 billion in new revenues. it did contain four specifics. four. cut medicare specific number one. $600 billion. cut medicaid, pays for nursing homes for seniors, of course. priority number two. three, cut the adequate cola for seniors on social security. even though 40% of seniors depend principally or totally upon social security and the cola already underestimated inflation particularly for medicare, essentials they need. cut that. not a driver of the deficit but, hey, cut that. one more specific. preserve the bush-era tax rates for income over $250,000. it's not a tax increase for everybody who earns over $250,000. it's only the income over $250,000 that would get additional taxes if the bush-era rates went away and the president's proposal was passed. but, no, they want to preserve -- totally preserve tax cuts for income over $250,000. they want to preserve the reduced capital gains rate and dividends rate which principally who ben pets, who else, millionaires and billionaires. now -- benefits, wh
and the white house. house republican leaders have made a counter offer to president obama in the fiscal cliff negotiations proposing to cut to true knowledge with a combination of spending cuts come entitlement reform, and new tax revenues. there was a three page letter signed by speaker boehner, majority leader eric cantor, and other senior republicans including representative paul ryan. and this mornings "washington journal," we heard about tax reductions and credits that would go away if the fiscal cliff passes in january. >> board or series looking into the so-called fiscal cliff, we turn our attention to deductions and tax loopholes. some of them are potentially on the chopping block. joining us from the wall street journal is don mckinnon. thanks so much for joining us today. what are the loopholes and deductions? we hear those words a lot, but what are they? guest: loopholes or tax breaks of all different sorts, and whether you like a particular loophole or not depends on where you sit, i guess. there are lots of loopholes that are deductions. deductions are those that most people are
that are part of the fiscal cliff package. they get much less attention than the bush tax cuts. they are part of the packet of decisions that congress has to make. host: we can go into debt but to highlight four --th let's start with the child tax credit. what is it? guest: this is a credit that applies to families, some that you can use if you make up to ,000.0 it is they $1,000 credit for each child. unless congress acts, that 10000 becomedit will $500, but becomes less valuable. you can make up to $130,000. host: that is the child tax credits. guest: almost 24 million families claimed it in 2009. it is one of the bigger tax credits out there. host: the next one would be the child and dependent care tax credit. guest: is a credit between 20% and a 30% and goes up to $3,000. it helps families with their expenses for child care or if they have dependents and things like that. you can basically claim a credit of $3,000. host: for child care purposes? guest: this helps with dependents. host: the earned income tax credit is what? guest: it is a credit whose primary recipients are working parents
a fiscal cliff. look, if you don't cut at least $4 trillion over 10 years, which is $400 billion a year, we are running a deficit at that time around $1.5 trillion over what we were bringing in. they are saying, i thought it was pretty modest, if you don't cut at least $400 billion of the $1.5 trillion you are overspending, then you are going to get downgraded. leaders in both parties really didn't take that seriously. so they came back with a proposal of a super committee and if the super committee didn't reach an agreement on $1.2 trillion over 10 years, $120 billion, a reduction from the overspending of $1.5 trillion, that should have been a drop in the bucket. that's nothing. we should have been able to cut that much. we didn't do. so now the sequestrations are looming and we come back to this issue again. i'm shocked so many people have already forgotten. when we failed to cut $4 trillion over 10 years from our budget back in the summer of 2011, we got downgraded. and things got more expensive. geithner back then was saying august 2, the world comes to an end financially. we are going
as the fiscal cliff take effect. bloomberg government hosted a discussion this morning with the top democrat on the house budget committee, chris van hollen as well as republican senator bob corker and senator mark warner. at 9:00 eastern, president obama and house spear jaub boehner and spoke about the fiscal cliff today. republicans might be willing to agree to higher tax rates on the wealthy in january. house speaker calling on the obama administration to respond to the republicans' deficit proposal. president obama is at 9:00 eastern followed by speaker boehner. >> this weekend on c-span 3's american history tv, follow harry truman's eldest grandson to japan. >> everybody has their own view what happened and i don't want to argue survival to anyone in japan about the history. we're past that. and my whole purpose for being here is to listen to the living and to do what i can. >> sunday at 9:00 p.m. eastern on c-span 3. >> the supreme court will look at what was passed in 2008 by a majority of 6-3 i believe and going to say that is precedent. and indiana had a -- >> they decided on the in
, at least our former members of congress here. do they cut a deal, congressmen? to avoid the fiscal cliff before we actually get there? >> i believe so. >> senator? >> yes, as long as you realize that the treasury secretary sets withholding taxes, he doesn't have to raise it even if the taxes go up and the sequester doesn't have to happen month by month. you can do the sequester in the last month of 12 months if you want. so it gives the congress anotherality or nine -- probably four or five month the next year before they have to reach a deal. >> you're thinking they could kick the can down the road but who thinks the market's not going to let them do that? they'll be punished. >> they'll be hugely punished. >> sooner rather than later? >> immediately. >> we haven't seen it so far. >> >> the herd will turn. erskine's got a very famous line that says, we got away with it last time because we had the best-looking horse in the glue factory or whatever he says. we're not going to get it passed this time. >> we're not going to get it passed. no. >> the president doesn't want a deal. >> we wil
, what's known as the fiscal cliff. and they're talking about the economy as well with the senate majority leader, harry reid, and house speaker, john boehner. this after a 90-minute meeting with president obama at the white house this morning where they called for a quick resolution. the governors spoke to reporters at the white house for 15 minutes after that meeting and we'll show you as much as we can until the house gavels in in just a few minutes. >> well, goorn, everybody. i'm jack, the chair of the national governors association, the governor of delaware, joined by governor fallen of oklahoma, she's the vice chair -- governor fallin of oklahoma, she's the vice chair. the governor of arkansas. we are three democrats and three republicans. we just had what i would say was a very good meeting with the president. we came in part to make sure that the voices and the issues that we face as governors in states are heard and considered as part of the discussions going on here in washington. the president was very open to that. said we would continue to have a seat at the table. we
and more at our special webpage c-span.org/fiscal cliff. now to the senate side of capitol hill for gos on the pending tax hikes and budget cuts. >> there's enough writing on the walls to fill quite a few pages about republicans deciding the right thing to do is protect the middle class. and we need to do it now. it's really important that this holiday season that the middle class is not going to be burdened with the thought that they may hit a $2,200 a year tax increase. there have been positive developments this week. we've had a list of republicans that have decided clearly that the best interest of the american people is to pass the bill we passed here last july, confirming the tax cut continues for the middle class. i think that the proposal we have from mitch mcconnel this morning is to avoid a debt ceiling battle that cost our economy billions of $s. he came up with the requested in the first place. enge that's good, to give the president authority to raise the debt. so i think if what we need to do is look at his proposal. i just got it from my staff. we're going to have some me
issues we have to work out? we know there is broad agreement that going over the so-called fiscal cliff would jeopardize the economic recovery. it would do that by increasing taxes on families, halting employment growth, driving unemployment up instead of down, triggering a deep cuts to programs that families across the country count on. the job before the united states congress is to reach an agreement that builds on the economic progress that we are making, and puts us on a path to fiscal stability. we need to cut more spending, and generate more revenue. we need to do it in a smart way that keeps our economy growing. earlier this year, congress extended the payroll tax cut through 2012. the two percentage point payroll tax cut has played an important role to sustain the recovery. boosting economic growth by an estimated 0.5% of one percentage point, and creating 400,000 jobs. we should continue the payroll tax cut through 2013, and yesterday i introduce legislation that would keep the employee payroll tax at 4.2% next year. to keep the economy growing -- there is good evidence of tha
. again, we don't think social security should be on the table in these fiscal cliff discussions. not the driver of the deficit, and further down the line, we think it's important to not mess with the age or switch to the chain c.p.i. or any other cuts that would affect beneficiaries. mr. scott: would the gentlelady yield? ms. moore: i yield. mr. scott: people caulk about increasing the age of social security or cost of living increase, the first question is whether or not you're going to cut social security. and then if you decide to cut social security, the different -- there are different ways to have doing it. some more painful than others. but the first question is, are you cutting social security? but part of the question is, why? if none of the tax cuts get extended, at this point you have more money than you need on the table system of the only reason you're even discussing a cut in social security is because you want to extend the tax cut. now i think most people when they're faced with the choice, do you want social security to be a piggy bank every time we're running s
Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14